The Moral Of Eason’s Fables (Updated!)

CNN announced the resignation of Eason Jordan this evening as CNN’s chief news executive, sending “shock waves” through the news organization as the blogosphere has imposed accountability on the mainstream media:

CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan resigned Friday, saying the controversy over his remarks about the deaths of journalists in Iraq threatened to tarnish the network he helped build.
Jordan conceded that his remarks at the January 27 World Economic Forum were “not as clear as they should have been.” Several participants at the event said Jordan told the audience U.S. forces had deliberately targeted journalists — a charge he denied. …
The resignation sent shock waves through CNN — with Jordan long admired by his peers, from executives to the rank-and-file. Jordan joined CNN as an assistant assignment editor in 1982 and rose through the ranks to become CNN’s chief news executive.

The moral of the story: the media can’t just cover up the truth and expect to get away with it — and journalists can’t just toss around allegations without substantiation and expect people to believe them anymore.
I’ll post more later.
UPDATE: I want to thank everyone who sent me e-mails and comments congratulating me and the many other bloggers who helped bring the truth to light about Eason Jordan. Bloggers like La Shawn Barber and the entire gang at Easongate, Slublog, Dinocrat, and all the others that I know I’m forgetting, as well as journalists like the incredibly courageous and intrepid Michelle Malkin, Jim Geraghty, and Roderick Boyd made all the difference in bringing accountability to the mainstream media. More importantly than that, they gave justice to our fine young men and women serving America and the cause of liberty and freedom in Iraq and around the world. Never forget that they were the target of Eason Jordan’s lies and slanders.
Even to the end, Eason Jordan couldn’t be honest about the entire incident:

“While my CNN colleagues and my friends in the U.S. military know me well enough to know I have never stated, believed, or suspected that U.S. military forces intended to kill people they knew to be journalists, my comments on this subject in a World Economic Forum panel discussion were not as clear as they should have been.”

Jordan never addressed his comments in Lisbon last November, where the Guardian quoted him saying this:

Eason Jordan, chief news executive at CNN, said there had been only a “limited amount of progress”, despite repeated meetings between news organisations and the US authorities.”
Actions speak louder than words. The reality is that at least 10 journalists have been killed by the US military, and according to reports I believe to be true journalists have been arrested and tortured by US forces,” Mr Jordan told an audience of news executives at the News Xchange conference in Portugal.

Jordan’s track record, extensively detailed in my CNN category, shows that his performance at Davos was no fluke or simple misstatement. Jordan has a long track record of unsubstantiated allegations of atrocities by the US military (and Israel’s) that only became an issue after the blogosphere finally caught up to it. His dishonesty reflects the increasing awareness of CNN as a seriously flawed news organization.
Why resign now? I believe that CNN saw the issue gaining momentum, not losing it, as many members of Congress called for an answer and the release of the videotape. CNN’s executives must have pressed Jordan for a clearer answer or to produce the videotape. After all, Eason Jordan sat on the World Economic Forum’s board, and presumably his request for its release would get serious attention. When Jordan failed to get it or even ask for it, I think CNN saw the writing on the wall.
Some of you asked where I was and why I hadn’t yet blogged it. Well, ironically I was attending a live Hugh Hewitt event in Burnsville when we found out about the resignation. Hugh had me on the air earlier in the show to talk about Eason’s Fables, and I went on briefly again for a reaction. Needless to say, the audience erupted in delight and disbelief, and Hugh told them to watch the news coverage of Jordan’s resignation. The man who probably was the most responsible for the blogswarm of Eason’s Fables pointed out that the networks, which had yet to address the issue, now needed to report the resignation of the head of a news organization for a scandal they never reported to their viewers.
How credible will their audience find them after that?
CNN isn’t the only organization damaged by Eason’s Fables. Unlike Memogate, most major news outlets ignored this story for two weeks while it gathered steam in the blogosphere and finally broke out through the punditry. The MSM may have taken a mortal blow, and the age of limited information availability has died along with it.
And thank you, my readers, for all of your encouragement and assistance. I always say that CQ isn’t one blogger but a community, and a blogger without readers is a diarist. I think we all can take some justified satisfaction with our small part in changing the world tonight.

17 thoughts on “The Moral Of Eason’s Fables (Updated!)”

  1. Eason Jordan Quits

    Looks like he couldn’t withstand the power of the New Media: 6:40 PM ET Feb 11, 2005 SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — CNN’s top news executive, Eason Jordan, said Friday he’s resigning amid controversy over his assertion that journalists were targeted…

  2. Eason Jordan Resigns: Truth!

    National Review Online reporting. Developing…
    Update: Associated Press also reporting: CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan quit Friday amidst a furor over remarks he made in Switzerland last month about journalists killed by the U.S. military in…

  3. More thoughts on Eason Jordan and the Blogs

    Stones Cry Out suggests that the blogosphere celebrations and self-congratulations be short and sweet. I concur. Not only because – as SCO maintains – there are so many other stories that need attention, but because as I suggested here, how we succee…

  4. Eason Jordan Quits

    Eason Jordan Quits …. The moral of the story is: If you give out fake, asinine stories get ready to be roasted by the blogosphere. Did this guy not learn by ‘Rathergate’? I would like to congratulate The Captain…

  5. Eason Jordan Resigns

    He was silent, CNN wouldn’t report it, but he couldn’t run away from his comments alleging that the U.S. military was deliberately killing journalists in Iraq. Eason Jordan resigns:NEW YORK (AP) – CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan quit Friday amid …

  6. What was that people were saying about the power o

    That son of a bitch Eason Jordan resigned whining that the controversy over his remarks threatened to tarnish the reputation of the Network he helped to build. muahahaha…as they say on the Usenet. His networks reputation was tarnished as soon as he…

  7. Eason Jordan Resigns

    Reactions are rolling in from around the blogosphere. First, the obligatory excerpt from the big news:
    CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan quit Friday amid a furor over remarks he made in Switzerland last month about journalists killed by the U.S…

  8. Eason Quits, the Blog Roars

    NEW YORK – CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan quit Friday amidst a furor over remarks he made in Switzerland last month about journalists killed by the U.S. military in Iraq. Jordan said he was quitting to avoid CNN being “unfairly tarnished” by the…

  9. Eason Quits, the Blog Roars

    NEW YORK – CNN chief news executive Eason Jordan quit Friday amidst a furor over remarks he made in Switzerland last month about journalists killed by the U.S. military in Iraq. Jordan said he was quitting to avoid CNN being “unfairly tarnished” by the…

  10. More On Eason’s Resignation

    Glenn Reynolds has a link-filled round-up of Bloggers and journalists outside the Blogosphere commenting on Eason Jordan’s resignation. He links to Ed Morrisey, who notes Jordan’s serial history of military slanders, and writes:the networks, which had …

  11. Jordan conquered

    Jordan’s resignation is a clear indicator that the video would not have absolved him: he slandered the US military in a public forum that was hostile to the US invasion of Iraq, gave credence to lies about US troops and later accepted congratulations f…

  12. CNN News Executive Eason Jordan Quits

    Jordan said he was quitting to avoid CNN being “unfairly tarnished” by the controversy.
    During a panel discussion at the World Economic Forum (news – web sites) last month, Jordan said he believed that several journalists who were killed by coalitio…

  13. Eason Jordan’s Resigned! One Down — One to Go!

    Boy, I take yesterday afternoon off from reading and blogging to celebrate my birthday and miss the big story — Eason Jordan quits! I caught up with it this AM in the LATimes, way back on page 9 of the “A” section, guess the Tribune Co. doesn’t fe…

  14. Network coverage of Jordan resignation

    There seems to be an unwillingness on the part of CBS or NPR to come to terms completely with the resignation of Eason Jordan. I suspect that they would like to sweep this incident under the rug.
    Don’t talk about it and our audience won’t think abo…

  15. Corrections

    Patrick Frey has a good guest column in the L.A. Times on the proper way to run corrections. To sum up: make major corrections as visible as the original story. If the mistake was on the front page, then put…

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